Promise.tv shows promise

promise.tv

Promise.tv takes advantage of digital television technology to automatically record a full seven day’s broadcasting across all selected TV channels. This wholesale recording means it is no longer necessary to choose programmes to watch in advance. All programmes transmitted over the last seven days are stored for viewing at any time.

Rather than having to pre-select what you want to watch, as is the case with current digital recorders, the promise.tv system records everything, from all channels, and keeps it for up to 7 days.

Promise.tv website

Read on for the breakdown of the techy stuff

from http://promise.tv/technology.html

The video data is stored in a circular format such that the newest programmes automatically overwrite the oldest programmes, and a continuous seven days programming is available at any time.

Simultaneously, the stored multiplexes may be retrieved for decoding and display on a television, enabling any channel recorded on any day to be viewed at any time.

Programmes can be saved for longer than the seven day period. By tagging them after they have been stored, they can be transferred to a separate storage area for archiving. Programmes can also be transferred to external storage such as DVD.

The system can be expanded by adding more storage to permit, for example, one entire months broadcast transmissions to be stored.

As presently configured, up to four separate remote decoder boxes (thin clients) can be added away from the main promise.tv storage unit. This would allow four different (or even the same!) recorded programmes to be viewed simultaneously on separate televisions.

Programmes can be found through different indexing methods, including a simple time and day listing, alpha-numeric search, favourites and a category based (genre) filter. This divides programmes into ten categories including for example sport, entertainment, childrens and music. This information is extracted from the metadata which is transmitted alongside the programmed by the broadcaster

Posted: August 11th, 2005
Categories: News
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